Posted by & filed under Uncategorized.

3CDC has joined our growing list of employers who are seeing the benefits of hiring someone who has a disability through our Supported Employment Program. Steve Leeper, president & CEO of 3CDC, told us some of the reasons he values Troy are because, “Troy is timely, reliable, a people person and a team player. He takes pride in making sure that our office is neat, clean and presentable to the public.” Troy told us he enjoys working at 3CDC because, “I like to be included and I like to save my money to buy things.”

Please learn more about our Supported Employment Program, how your company can benefit from hiring someone with a disability here or by calling Diane at 513-861-5233.

 

Why hiring an employee with a disability has been good for 3CDC, a Cincinnati company.

Posted by & filed under LADD Events.

Our 2017 Cincinnati ReelAbilities Film Festival featured more than 60 films that showcased the art, lives and stories of diverse people who have disabilities. One example, Stray Dog, was following a Veterans Brunch tribute. 

Gregory Nelson, a junior at Wright State University majoring in liberal arts, was one of our attendees and wrote this review of the film. 

 

“Stray Dog”

Today on March 11, I saw the movie “Stray Dog” at the Duke Energy Center in downtown Cincinnati. The film is about a Vietnam War veteran (Ron), who goes by the name “Stray Dog”. Stray Dog was produced in a manner where he never spoke to the camera, and neither did anyone else. The camera crew strictly filmed Stray Dog and his interactions with people, in other words, was no acting in this movie. My opinions and thoughts on the movie will be found in the following paragraphs.

The film takes place in 2014 at Ron’s trailer in Missouri. The movie centers on Ron and his wife, and the people that are close to them. This documentary shows how Ron is no ordinary war veteran. Ron is juggling many responsibilities. Some of these responsibilities include paying tribute to those that had lost their lives in all wars fought for the United States, helping those who struggle with Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, give advice to his granddaughters, help his wife reunite with her sons, and run a trailer park. There is a scene where Ron describes himself as not a good person, mainly due to his actions during the Vietnam War that he is ashamed of. He refuses to forgive himself, for he believes that if he does, he is dishonoring his fellow soldiers. Today, Ron gives back to the community in numerous ways. One small example would be how he gave one of the trailer park members a break on his rent. Overall, this documentary shows Ron giving back to the community, even though he has no obligation to do so.

Ron is someone who chooses to live with just the bare necessities. He does not want the finer qualities in life, as he feels that freedom is the greatest quality of life there is. Another aspect of Ron would be how he is acting like a father figure to his wife’s sons who had just moved to Missouri from Mexico, and a father figure to his daughter who is trying to raise her two children. Ron states many times, that without his wife, he would not be able to do what he does on a regular basis because she supports him in every aspect of his life. There are a few examples of when she goes to see her sons in Mexico, and Ron struggles to do basic tasks at home without her.

Ron taking the initiative on his own to go help others, and change who he is as a person, is one aspect I really enjoyed about this documentary. His wife offers to get a job to help pay for her sons living in the trailer park with them. He turns down that offer, stating that having her at home is move important to him and that he can handle the finances on his own. The movie had a ton of different emotional aspects, which kept me entertained throughout. I can say that I have no complaints about this film.

I learned from this movie to have compassion for all veterans, regardless of how you feel about a certain war. When it comes down to it, they are human beings who have challenges like the rest of us.

I would recommend this movie to veterans and active military members. With that being said anyone could benefit from watching this movie. This movie is rated PG-13.

I would give this movie a 9.5 of out 10.

More about Gregory Nelson: Gregory is a junior at Wright State University in Dayton Ohio. He is majoring in liberal arts.  His major hobby is anything sports related. He is a big fan of many Ohio teams including his hometown Cincinnati Bengals and Reds as well as the Cleveland Cavaliers and FC Cincinnati. He is big OSU fan. Gregory has Cerebral Palsy, a neurological disorder that prevents him from doing the simple things many people take for granted. Despite having very little physical control over his body, with assistance, Gregory has managed to go to school like his siblings and graduated from high school with honors. He was the sports reporter for his middle school and today has a Facebook page where he comments and shares news and facts on many Ohio sports teams.

Posted by & filed under Employment.

We are so proud to have been part of Connect|Ability Week, a career shadowing experience for students with disabilities sponsored by the Cincinnati USA Regional Chamber in partnership with Opportunities for Ohioans with Disabilities, LADD, University of Cincinnati, Miami University, Hamilton Co. DDS and Butler Co. Board of DD, the program promoted employment of people with disabilities. Our Susan Brownknight is chairing the Chamber’s Advisory Committee of its national pilot program to further disability inclusion in small businesses and this was part of that. Students with disabilities were matched with local employers to explore careers, receive career advice, and learn more about the employability skills needed for future jobs. Thank you to everyone who participated and made this a successful week of learning for both potential future employees and employers.

Student Seth Leonard job shadowed Kroger employee Charles Sanders.

A student at Cincinnati State Technical and Community College studying software technology engineering, Seth Leonard spent an afternoon at the corporate headquarters of Kroger. (He is pictured on the right, sitting next to Kroger employee Charles Sanders.) “I like the fun and professional atmosphere at Kroger,” Seth told us.

LADD’s Jenny Crowe spent an afternoon at School Outfitters, which offers quality, fairly priced products to help educators create a comfortable learning environment. Kristin Guerrini, School Outfitters human resources generalist (pictured with Jenny), told us, “We work with Ohioans with Disabilities as a company partnership and a recruiting resource to hire qualified candidates with Disabilities. We were asked to help pilot ConnectAbility. ConnectAbility is a career shadowing experience for students with disabilities.  Sponsored by the Cincinnati USA Regional Chamber in partnership with Opportunities for Ohioans with Disabilities, LADD, University of Cincinnati, Miami University, Hamilton Co. DDS and Butler Co. Board of DD, the program is designed to promote employment of people with disabilities.  We were excited and welcomed the opportunity to be involved. As an employer, we wanted to provide this great experience to students and also wanted to learn how we could improve our various jobs enny Crowe job shadowed at School Outfitters through Connect|Ability Week, a career shadowing experience for students with disabilities sponsored by the Cincinnati USA Regional Chamber for people with disabilities. “

#ConnectAbility #InclusionWorks

Posted by & filed under LADD Events.

 

STABLE Accounts 101


We know that saving money is very important to an individual’s long term ability to live independently. We also know that federal law says that people with disabilities are VERY restricted in terms of how much they can earn and save without losing critical benefits such as Social Security and Medicaid. (A person cannot have more than $2000 in a bank account before jeopardizing critical services like access health care.)

 

The All New STABLE Account Is Life Changers For Individuals With Disabilities And Their Families
A STABLE Account is an investment account available to eligible individuals with disabilities. STABLE Accounts are made possible by the federal Achieving a Better Life Experience (“ABLE”) Act. STABLE Accounts allow individuals with disabilities to save and invest money without losing eligibility for certain public benefits programs, like Medicaid, SSI, or SSDI. Earnings in your STABLE Account are not subject to federal income tax, so long as you spend them on “Qualified Disability Expenses” and up to $14,000 can be contributed into it annually.

With thanks to advocate Chip Gerhardt, president of downtown-based Government Strategies Group, former chairman of the National Down Syndrome Society, and father to Anne – Ohio and the country’s very first STABLE Account holder, Ohio became the first state to pass the federal Achieving a Better Life Experience Act, known as the ABLE Act in June 2016. After ten years of Chip’s lobbying Congress, the law has amended Section 529 of the IRS Code, allowing for these tax-free savings accounts for those who have disabilities. Since then, more than 1000 accounts have been opened in three states (Florida, Tennessee, and Nebraska) and 15 more states are expected to go live by the end of 2016.

If you are someone with a disability, or you have a family member with a disability, we urge you to please join Chip, ourselves, and our partner agencies to learn about STABLE Accounts, the benefits, and the registration process at our upcoming event. It is FREE; however, we ask that you please pre-register here.

STABLE ACCOUNTS 101
A Pathway To Financial Security For People With Disabilities

featuring Chip Gerhardt, president of Government Strategies Group, LLC who spearheaded the passage of the ABLE Act

WHEN:   Wednesday, November 2, 2016 from 7 pm to 8:30 pm
WHERE:   Fifth Third Bank; 5050 Kinglsey Dr; Cincinnati, Ohio 45227
COST:   FREE
PARKING:   Directly in front of building in visitor spots
REGISTRATION:  Click here
PRE-REGISTRATION IS REQUIRED AND SPACE IS LIMITED.

Posted by & filed under Employment, LADD Staff.

Wylie Jones is director of quality assurance and programs for Cincinnati nonprofit organization, LADD

Please meet Wylie Jones, LADD’s director of quality assurance and programs, and learn more about his passion for his work.

LADD:  Please, share with us what your job involves.

Wylie: My role is basically to support our program staff in making sure that they have what they need to provide great services, ensure that the folks they are supporting have the best possible opportunities to achieve what they want for their lives, and to encourage our LADD team and others in the field to pursue excellence in what they do.

LADD: Please tell us your own personal impression of LADD and our work.

Wylie: LADD is a unique place. I come from an academic background and have always thought of LADD as the Harvard of provider agencies. A big reason for that is our emphasis on education based programming, but it extends to the quality of the agency’s leadership, our reputation in the field, and the excellent and well trained people we have engaged directly with folks to help them learn, explore, and develop.

LADD: How have you personally been impacted from working at LADD?

Wylie: I started at LADD over 18 years ago as a direct support professional in one of our houses. I often describe my career at LADD as a very fortunate accident. Fortunate in that LADD has given me the opportunity to develop new skills and test myself in new ways for all of those years and to build relationships with the people associated with LADD that are very important to me and have given direction to my life. An ‘accident’ in that I would have to honestly say I knew very little about what the work was going to involve when I first started other than it had to do with working with people and teaching. It turns out that it’s a great field where one can really have a huge impact for the good and LADD definitely equips you to do that.

Posted by & filed under Community Connections.

We asked Jeremy what he likes about participating in our Community Connections program. This is what he told us. And to Jeremy…we like to have fun too! Even better when you are having fun with us!

If you are unfamiliar, our Community Connections is the only non-facilities based program of its kind in Cincinnati. In groups of 3 to 5 adults, they choose places in our area to explore with one of our social guides. Those outings may include volunteer work or recreational activities. The program reduces isolation and also provides an opportunity for participants to learn and strengthen life and communication skills, build confidence through decision making, and explore their own likes and dislikes.

Jeremy participates in Cincinnati nonprofit LADD's Community Connections program. We asked Jeremy what he likes about participating in our Community Connections program. This is what he told us. And to Jeremy...we like to have fun too! Even better when you are having fun with us! If you are unfamiliar, our Community Connections is the only non-facilities based program of its kind in Cincinnati. In groups of 3 to 5 adults, they choose places in our area to explore with one of our social guides. Those outings may include volunteer work or recreational activities. The program reduces isolation and also provides an opportunity for participants to learn and strengthen life and communication skills, build confidence through decision making, and explore their own likes and dislikes.

Posted by & filed under Community Supported Living.

There is a proverb that reminds us, “The only difference between stumbling blocks and stepping stones is the way we use them.”

At LADD, we see obstacles and challenges as opportunities to learn, and strengthen our resilience. We teach, support and encourage individuals to grow wings, and live the kind of independence that gives their lives meaning.  As can happen to any one of us, life sometimes throws us curve balls. It is that journey that gives us resolve and brings people together.

Vince and his roommate Mike reminded us of this lesson.

Since becoming roommates seven years ago (and eight years prior for Vince), LADD’s Community Supported Living team have been available to assist them whether that be providing transportation when needed to get to appointments or work, or ensuring their medicine is measured.

They are a pretty busy pair. Mike manages his time between two jobs, one at the Blue Ash YMCA and the other at Christian Moerlein restaurant downtown; and Vince has been employed by Whole Foods for over 12 years.  They mCincinnati nonprofit organization, LADD (Living Arrangements for the Developmentally Disabled) has a Community Supported Living program to assist people with living independentlyake a pretty good team. According to Vince, “I memorize Mike’s appointments and schedule, do the bathroom, and I am the dish master. I like to tease him a little bit too.”

On June 28, 2016, ‘community’ in every sense of the word was seen through a new lens. It was around 4:00 am when Mike awoke and smelled smoke in their Oakley apartment. An explosion had occurred in their building. He rushed to awaken Vince and the two went outside on their patio. One of their neighbors pulled them to safety, a man who heroically risked his life (as did his wife) to not only save Vince and Mike, but others in the building as well.

LADD’s Eric Sunderman, our community supporting living coordinator, got a call shortly after. Since then, Eric and other staff spent much of the next few weeks finding a new apartment and new furniture, and moving what furniture could be salvaged. The two roommates moved into their new place in August, without interruption to their work and busy lives. Vince sat down with Eric recently to talk with a visitor. Their banter back and forth made it clear theirs was much more than a working relationship.  Resting an arm on his friend’s shoulder, Vince added, “Eric’s the man.”

It was at LADD’s Taking Flight Awards where Vince got to see the man who saved his life for the first time since the explosion.

“Thank you,” Vince said. Two words that say it all.

Posted by & filed under Community Supported Living.

We have such a dedicated team here at LADD. Eric Sunderman is among us, beginning his LADD career in November 2010 as a direct support professional before his promotion in May, 2015, to program coordinator for our Community Supported Living. Eric Sunderman is program coordinator for Cincinnati nonprofit, Ladd's Community Supportive Living Program.We asked him why he enjoys what he does. This is what he told us.


Tell us one of the reasons you look forward to going to work.

The most rewarding thing is seeing people we we work withlourish and accomplish their goals. That doesn’t have to be some grand event, either—typically, it’s just people doing what they want to do in the way that makes them happy. To be a part of that process is fantastic.

 

What is the most challenging part of your job?

There are many challenging things about this job—responding to crises, never having enough resources, and trying to work with bureaucracies that can be outright antagonistic to the needs of people with disabilities. Still, the challenges are always worth it if you can help someone get the things they need to be successful and happy.

 

About our Community Supported Living Program: While living in their own home, apartment or family residence, this service offers people with developmental disabilities the option of developing independent living skills while learning how to access shopping, banks, churches, recreation facilities and public transportation

Posted by & filed under Employment.

Working in partnership with businesses across Greater Cincinnati, LADD’s Supported Employment Program is unique in its approach to  assisting people with developmental disabilities in finding and keeping meaningful, competitive employment.


Individuals come to us from varying backgrounds, skills, and wants in a job. It is our first focus to get to know that person through a process of discovery so that we can facilitate the best match for both the employer and the employee. Once hired, our job coach is on site to support that employee, his/her co-workers, and their relationship to help everyone succeed. The follow-along phase occurs after the coaching is faded, and is our ongoing support to assist with any possible adjustments or issues that may arise.

Some of the businesses who have hired individuals through our Supported Employment Program include:
Contemporary Art Center
Kroger Co.
Llanfair Retirement Community
Mercy Hospital
LADD employees
LaRosa’s
McDonalds
Randstad
Fresh Thyme
Buffalo Wild Wings
IHOP

We would like to introduce you to our Supported Employment Program Director, Diane Gaither-Thompson.

What is your greatest personal satisfaction with doing your job?
My greatest personal satisfaction is knowing I have helped an individual reach a personal goal that enhances his/her quality of life, their self-esteem and brings them a sense of accomplishment. It is a joy to know/see how much satisfaction folks derive from getting the job they desire, making new friends and feeling appreciated and valued for what they bring.

Diane Gaither-Thompson is Cincinnati nonprofit LADD's Supported Employment Program Manager for adults with developmental disabilitiesWhat are some basic tips for employers on helping people with disabilities to succeed in the workplace?
1.    Receive and value what our folks bring to the business/organization/agency.

2.    Know that inclusion and diversity enhance the bottom line for business such as expanded patron base, increased productivity,          and employee loyalty.                                     

3.    Know that the economic cost of disregarding 20% of the population is not a ‘best practice’.

4.    There are tax incentives (WOTC) to hiring disabled individuals and legal advantages.

5.     Compliance with legal requirements reduces the possibility of discrimination complaints.

Tell us about what a good day at work looks like for you.
A good day looks like a job placement, helping an employer develop a long term strategy for successful inclusion of disabled folks into the business, exchanging ideas with peers relative to innovative ideas around SE, receiving referrals to welcome into the program, no billing to complete

What would you like to say to employers about why hiring someone with a disability is good for their business? 
I would say that hiring individuals with disabilities is the first step to broadening their business base. By practicing inclusion and diversity, the company reaps financial rewards, improved reputation in the community and workers who are loyal and productive. 

Tell us about your background prior to LADD, and how does that relate to your current work?
My background includes graduating from UC at a time when there were few minorities accepted/graduating from professional programs there; I majored in psychology and eventually became an EEO Investigator for the state. My career path advanced to being an EEO Investigator/Counselor with the federal government and later an AA Officer with a state institution of higher learning.  I spent over 30 years in the enforcement arm of discrimination law. I also served as a substitute teacher with Cincinnati (23 yrs.)/Norwood Public (5yrs.) Schools.  I believe my education, experience and exposure have prepared me to most currently work in the social aspect of interpretation and application of laws relevant to individuals with disabilities.   

How long have you been at LADD?
On August 22, I celebrated my 11th year anniversary.

 

Interested in learning more about our Supported Employment Program? Please contact Diane at Diane@laddinc.org or call 513-861-5233.

Posted by & filed under Community Connections.

So very often at LADD, you will find members of our team who have had long careers here because this is so much more than a job, it is a passion. Our Faith Maynard is among them. She joined LADD 14 years ago as a direct support professional for our Margaret B. Geier Apartments, later serving as a social guide for our Community Connections, then as coordinator for our Community Supported Living, before her new role as our Community Connections program manager.

If you are unfamiliar, our Community Connections is the only non-facilities based program of its kind in Cincinnati. In groups of 3 to 5 adults, they choose places in our area to explore with one of our social guides. Those outings may include volunteer work or recreational activities. Community Connections reduces isolation and also provides an opportunity for participants to learn and strengthen life and communication skills, build confidence through decision making, and explore their own likes and dislikes.

Faith Maynard is program manager of Cincinnati nonprofit LADD's Community Connections program for adults with developmental disabilities“Participants in the program gain confidence through their decisions and experiences,” said Faith. “Part of this process of advocacy is taking stock of who they are – and what they want to accomplish by exploring what they like and don’t like in the world.”